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TitanCon 2019 Featured Participants

As well as our amazing Guests of Honour, we are proud to showcase some of the amazing people who will be appearing at our convention. There's lots more to be added here too, so keep checking back!

Island of Ireland Literature


Paul Kearney

Paul Kearney

Paul Kearney was born in County Antrim, Northern Ireland in 1967. He Studied Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse and Middle English at Oxford University and published his first novel, The Way to Babylon, in 1992, followed by A Different Kingdom (1993) and Riding the Unicorn (1994).

The author of the Monarchies of God, Sea-Beggars, and Macht series, his latest books are The Wolf in the Attic, published by Solaris, and Calgar’s Fury (in the Warhammer 40,000 universe) from the Black Library.

His forthcoming books include The Burning Horse, a sequel to The Wolf in the Attic, and further work in the Warhammer setting.

He has lived in Denmark and the United States, but currently inhabits a cottage on the shore of County Down with his wife, dog, and a beaten-up old boat.

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Andy Luke

Andy Luke

Andy Luke is a Belfast author and comics creator. His autobiography, Absence: a comic about epilepsy, won an UnLtd Millennium Award and is the most read single issue comic in Northern Ireland. Bottomley, a short strip about war fraud, ran in Soaring Penguin's twice-Eisner nominated To End All Wars book, and was singled out for praise by 2000AD creator Pat Mills.

Andy co-produced and presented The Invisible Artist, a documentary charting forty years of Belfast comics for Northern Visions TV. He co-ran the UK's first comics blog, Bugpowder, from 2000-2013, and served as secretary from 2005-2008 on the long-running Caption festival. A key figure in the campaign to limit table costs for indy creators at British comics festivals through essays and unionisation, as well as work with event organisers, and the London Underground Comics co-operative.

He has penned three prose novels: Axel America and the U.S. Election Race, Spide: The Lost Tribes, and Thor's Day In Juno, which debuts at Eurocon.

You can visit his website at http://andy-luke.com.

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Ian McDonald

Ian McDonald

We are thrilled to once again have Belfast's very own Ian McDonald back at TitanCon 2019: The Eurocon. Ian is a science-fiction novelist best known for his BSFA award winning and Hugo nominated novels River of Gods (2004), Brasyl (2007) and The Dervish House (2010). Ian won the 2007 Hugo Award for Best Novelette for The Djinn's Wife (2006). The novella Time Was (Tor.com) won the BSFA short fiction award for 2019.

Ian McDonald was born in 1960, in Manchester, to a Scottish father and Irish mother, but moved to Belfast when he was five, and has lived there ever since. He therefore lived through the whole of the 'Troubles' (1968-99), and his sensibility has been permanently shaped by coming to understand Northern Ireland as a post-colonial (and so, in his view, de facto 'Third World') society imposed on an older culture. He became a fan of SF from childhood TV, began writing when he was 9, sold his first story to a local Belfast magazine when he was 22, and in 1987 became a full-time writer.

Ian's first, and Locus Award winning novel Desolation Road (1988) is set on a partially terraformed Mars the novel outlines the history of a town called Desolation Road founded by a lone scientist and a collection of strays and castaways.

The Dervish House

Major themes of Ian's work include nanotechnology, postcyberpunk settings, and the impact of rapid social and technological change on non-Western societies. His 1990s Chaga Saga is particularly notable for its analysis of the AIDS crisis in Africa. River of Gods and it's companion novel of short stories Cyberabad Days (2009) is set in mid-21st-century India. Brasyl is set in the 18th and 21st centuries in Lusophone South America. The Dervish House (2010) took us to Istanbul, Turkey in the year 2025 and centred on the families that live in and around its titular house, it is at once a rich mosaic of Islamic life in the new century and a telling novel of future possibilities.

Ian's latest work is a trilogy of books that aim to do for the moon what his other work has done for India, Brazil and Turkey, which is to say write a thrilling story of the future that is rooted in the vivid realities of its location. The first book Luna: New Moon (2015) is described as Game of Thrones in space. It's a tale of corporate blood-letting and deceit on a massive scale set on a moon that, for all its lethal harshness, is described with such richness that you feel what it would be like to live (and die) there.

Ian read an excerpt from Luna: New Moon at our Literature Night in 2014, and the excerpt he read from Luna: Wolf Moon in 2017 was such a crowd-pleaser that we all demanded he read the same exerpt again last year!

The final part of the trilogy Luna: Moon Rising, was published in 2019. Forthcoming from Tor.com is a related novella The Menace from Farside.

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Jo Zebedee

Jo Zebedee

Jo Zebedee hails from just outside Belfast, and writes a mix of sci fi and fantasy. Described as a 'thoughtful and intelligent' writer (British Fantasy Society journal), and listed in The Guardian's list of top 10 Irish Science Fiction authors, she is the author of five novels and numerous short stories.

Her first work, The Inheritance Trilogy (Tickety Boo Press, 2015), presented a dark Space Opera inspired by classic SF. In it, she challenged the trope of the 'chosen one' and questioned what it would ask of someone to fulfil that role. Exploring psi powers, military leadership and political intrigue against a backdrop of Jo's characteristic close character work, the trilogy presents an ambitious first work. Abendau's Heir can be categorised as grimdark and takes the characters, and the reader, to some very dark corners of the universe.

Waters And The Wild

Jo is best known for her second novel, Inish Carraig, set in a post-alien invasion Belfast. The city presents a familiar, but changed, picture, which challenges perceptions of Belfast. Described by sfbook.com as 'a gritty post invasion novel. There is a tense realism to the key scenes of conflict and some supporting cast manage to maintain a position of ambiguity right up until the end of the book. Scenes in the dark countryside where life becomes a desperate struggle from one moment to the next are chillingly real. The truest monsters in the text are particularly awful examples of humanity.'

Jo is currently working on a screenplay of the original novel, and a sequel to it, where she is intent on trashing the rest of the country, too.

Also set in Northern Ireland is Jo's first fantasy novel, Waters and the Wild (Inspired Quill, 2017). A blend of psychological horror with fantasy elements and a strong storyline focused on mental health and its fallout on wider families, Waters and the Wild is an ambitious project. 'It’s not a fairy tale as you know it; it’s almost more akin to a thriller feel, a cat-and-mouse game through the landscape and Amy’s head.' Sffworld.com

Jo lectures on creative writing and fantasy and sf fiction for the Crescent Arts Centre and the Irish Writers Centre, and has received support from the Arts Council of NI for her writing. She’s delighted to be welcomed along to TitanCon again and can’t wait to catch up with everyone.

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